Members
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Commissioner Steve Radack
Commissioners Court Representative
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Commissioner Steve Radack
Commissioners Court Representative
Steve Radack has devoted over forty years to serving the community. After eleven years with the Houston Police Department, he was elected to the position of Harris County Constable – Precinct Five in 1984. In 1988, he was elected to the first of eight terms as Harris County Commissioner – Precinct Three.

During his over twenty-nine years as County Commissioner, Steve has made it a priority to develop, maintain, and enhance quality parks and trails, facilities, and services for the residents of Precinct Three and Harris County.

Steve is married to Sherry Radack, Chief Justice of the First Court of Appeals. Steve and Sherry are the proud parents of four sons and five grandchildren. They attend St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church.
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Constable Alan Rosen
Constable's Office Representative
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Constable Alan Rosen
Constable's Office Representative
Constable Alan Rosen’s law enforcement knowledge, ethics, business experience, training, and education help him manage and lead the Harris County Precinct 1 Constable’s Office to further success and growth.

First elected in 2012 and re-elected in 2016, Constable Rosen has spent more than 27 years in local law enforcement, at the Constable’s Office and the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. He has worked in the Patrol Unit, Marine Patrol Unit, Warrants, Narcotics and Mental Health.

Constable Rosen has saved taxpayers’ money every year in office by bringing a business approach to managing the budget. During his first year in office, he created the first Precinct One Special Response Group, the S.W.A.T. – Certified Tactical Response Team and the Game Room and Prostitution Task Force. As a leader in emerging technology, Constable Rosen led Precinct 1 to become the first Harris County law enforcement to deploy body cameras for deputies. He also ensured that all personnel attend required law enforcement ethics training. He established the first Precinct 1 deputy to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s Anti-drug Task Force.

Constable Rosen has implemented numerous community outreach projects with more than 1000 hours of service. Annually, Constable Rosen hosts a Teen Summit to help bridge the gap between law enforcement and local youth.

Under his leadership, the Precinct 1 Constable’s Office was twice awarded the Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Outstanding Law Enforcement Agency of the Year and was also recognized as the National Night Out Rookie (agency) of the Year.

Constable Rosen was the recipient of the Acres Home Chamber of Business and Economic Development Inc.’s Empowerment Award in Community Politics for 2014 and the Greater Heights Chamber of Commerce’s Government Advocate of the Year Award for 2013. He was awarded the Presidential Volunteerism Award for 2009, 2010 and 2011. He is the recipient of the Chauncy Glover Project’s Heart of Houston Award and the Crime Stoppers Johnny Klevenhagen Award.

Constable Rosen served, or is serving on local civic boards and committees, including the MD Anderson Cancer Center Advance Team Board of Directors, the Greater Houston Visitors and Convention Bureau board of directors, the Houston Police Department – Citizen Review Committee, the Beth Yeshurun Day School Board of Directors (development chair), Beth Yeshurun Synagogue (security committee) and the Greater Heights Area Chamber of Commerce board of directors. He also serves on the Seven Acres Jewish Geriatric Home Board of Directors and currently co-chairs the Harris County Law Enforcement Technology Committee.

He is a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum, a Life Member of the 100 Club of Houston, and a Life Member of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo.

Constable Rosen who is a life-long Houstonian, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Houston, graduating with honors. He is deeply committed to keeping families safe, aggressively addressing crime issues and improving the quality of life for all residents of Precinct 1. He and his family are proud residents of Precinct 1.
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Kelvin Banks
Director, Pretrial Services
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Kelvin Banks
Director, Pretrial Services
Kelvin was appointed as the Director of Pretrial Services for Harris County on Oct. 1, 2016. He leads his staff to adhere to local, state and national pretrial standards.

The mission of Pretrial Services is to provide accurate and timely information to assist the Judicial Officers in Harris County with making informed pretrial release decisions and to monitor defendants released on bond to promote compliance with court orders, court appearances, and to support public safety.

Kelvin was previously the Director of Pretrial Services for The Third Judicial Circuit Court of Michigan in Detroit (Wayne County) from July of 2013 until September of 2016. He was also employed by the Third Circuit Court as a Clinical Probation Officer. He worked in this capacity from 2000 until 2013. His responsibilities were to supervise adjudicated defendants in the County of Wayne. He has also been employed as a Probation Officer at the Twenty-Ninth Circuit Court of Michigan (Gratiot County).

In the fall of 2018, Kelvin will begin a Doctorate of Social Work program at the University of Southern California. In May of 2012, Kelvin completed a Masters in Social Work at Wayne State
University. He received a Masters of Arts in Organizational Management & Leadership from the University of Phoenix in July of 2005. He also received a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Michigan State University in December of 1999.

Kelvin was inducted into the Michigan State University’s School of Criminal Justice Wall of Fame in 2015 for his distinguished-efforts in the field.
Kelvin has been married to Paulette A. Banks since 1996. They have six beautiful daughters. They enjoy spending quality time together as a family.
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Henry Gonzales
Executive Director, Juvenile Probation
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Henry Gonzales
Executive Director, Juvenile Probation
Henry has been with Harris County for more than 30 years. He started his career here with Pre-Trial Services and began his tenure with Harris County Juvenile Probation Department (HCJPD) as a diversion officer in the intake division. He eventually moved to the field services division of the department as a field officer, gang liaison and resource-training officer. As administrator in this division, he managed a specialized unit that included enhanced supervision programs such as a community-based Special Needs/Mental Health Diversionary Program, aftercare and gang and sex offender supervision units. Henry is engaged in the communities he works in and has served on various boards and advisory committees, including the school board of a local charter school. Henry used this experience in his role as the Deputy Director of the department’s Education Services Division, which is responsible for the department’s Excel Academy Charter School campuses and the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program. In 2010, Henry became the Assistant Executive Director of HCJPD. He was appointed Executive Director in 2018.
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Alex Bunin
Chief Public Defender
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Alex Bunin
Chief Public Defender
Alex Bunin is the Chief Public Defender for Harris County, Texas, an office he established in 2010. Previously, he was the Federal Public Defender for the Northern District of New York. In 1999, he was appointed by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to establish Federal Public Defender offices in the Districts of Northern New York and Vermont and he was twice reappointed to additional four-year terms. In 1995, before relocating to New York, he established and managed the federal defender organization in the Southern District of Alabama in Mobile. From 1993 to 1995, he was an Assistant Federal Public Defender in the Eastern District of Texas in Beaumont. From 1986 to 1993, he was in private practice in Houston, Texas. He earned Board Certification in Criminal Law and Criminal Appellate Law from the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. In over 30 years as a criminal defense lawyer, Mr. Bunin has tried many cases, including federal capital murder and complex white collar fraud. He received the Champion of Public Defense Award from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, the Thurgood Marshall Award for capital litigation from the New York City Bar Association and the Torch of Liberty Award from the Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association. He was an Adjunct Professor at Albany Law School of Union University from 2003-10. He sits on the Advisory Board of THE CHAMPION magazine and the CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAGAZINE of the American Bar Association. He served on the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers’ Board of Directors (2012-15), Executive Committee (2013-14), and committees on Federal Rules, Forensic Sciences, and Fourth Amendment Advocacy. He is Vice-Chair of the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association’s Public Defender Committee and a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum. As well as having written law review articles on federal sentencing and the death penalty, he is co-author of O’CONNOR’S FEDERAL CRIMINAL RULES & CODES (Jones McClure 2016).
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Dr. Teresa May
Director, Community Supervision and Corrections
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Dr. Teresa May
Director, Community Supervision and Corrections
Dr. May was appointed Director of the Harris County CSCD in 2013. She has over twenty years of experience in criminal justice and currently oversees the 3rd largest Community Supervision Department in the country.

She has worked extensively in the development, operation, and implementation of a number of evidence-based treatment programs and two comprehensive assessment centers for criminal justice involved individuals. In collaboration with Dr. Brian Lovins, Dr. May led the statewide initiative to adopt, validate, and implement the Texas Community Supervision Risk Assessment tool currently used across the State of Texas.

Dr. May serves on numerous local and state committees and provides testimony regarding policy and funding issues related to criminal justice programs to the Texas State Legislature.

Dr. May received her Ph.D. from Southern Methodist University (SMU) and is a licensed clinical psychologist in the State of Texas. Prior to serving in administrative roles, Dr. May provided forensic assessment and treatment services for the Court system and taught personality, forensic, and behavioral action of drug classes as an adjunct professor at Southern Methodist University.
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Kim Ogg
District Attorney
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Kim Ogg
District Attorney
Kim Ogg is the Harris County District Attorney. She is a native Houstonian licensed by the State Bar of Texas in 1987 and recognized as a specialist in Criminal Law by the Board of Legal Specialization since 1992. Upon taking office, she promised a new era of criminal justice by insuring a just process for the victim, the accused, and the community in every case. She has focused her prosecutors on public safety by prioritizing disposition of crimes against people and property.

Kim's legal career began in 1987 as a line prosecutor for the Harris County D.A. While serving as a Chief Felony Prosecutor, she was appointed Houston’s first Anti-Gang Task Force Director in 1994. From 1999 - 2006, Kim served as the Executive Director of Crime Stoppers of Houston. In 2006, Kim transitioned to private legal practice and became the managing partner of her own law firm.

Kim now brings her strong track record of public service and thirty years of criminal justice experience to the position of Harris County D.A. During the first six months of her Administration, she has successfully advanced major drug policy and bail reform, diversified the leadership of the District Attorney's Office and effected legislative reform on behalf of crime victims.
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Vince Ryan
County Attorney
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Vince Ryan
County Attorney
Vince Ryan was elected to a four-year term as the Harris County Attorney on November 4, 2008 and re-elected in 2012 and 2016. He is no stranger to the office, having served as an Assistant Harris County Attorney and First Assistant for former County Attorney Mike Driscoll from 1981 to 1987.

In 1987, Vince, with the support and help of many grassroots activists, scored an upset to win a seat on the Houston City Council for District C. He was reelected to two more terms.

Vince was appointed by the President, and later unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate, to serve on the Board of the Panama Canal Commission. This bi-national board oversaw the Canal and its historic transition to Panama on December 31, 1999.

Following his service on the Panama Canal Commission, Vince was associated with several prominent Houston law firms and continued his community involvement. In the last decade, he has served on various boards and is a founding board member of the Houston Tampico Sister City Association and the Houston Democratic Lawyers Association.

Born in Houston, Vince was raised by loving parents who instilled within him and his three siblings a sense of service to others.

As the Vietnam war raged, a 19-year-old Vince joined ROTC at the University of Houston and upon graduation became an active duty officer in the United States Army, first serving in Europe and then volunteering for service in Vietnam. He was returned to active duty for Operation Just Cause, which ousted the dictator of Panama, in 1990.

After his service in Vietnam, Vince left active duty and attended the University of Houston Law School. Soon he became active in the Neartown Association. While practicing law, Vince attended Rice University and received a Master's Degree.
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Judge Robert Schaffer
Administrative Judge, District Courts
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Judge Robert Schaffer
Administrative Judge, District Courts
Judge Robert Schaffer has been Judge of the 152nd Civil District Court since January 1, 2009, after being elected to the position in November 2008 and re-elected in 2012 and 2016. Prior to assuming the bench Judge Schaffer practiced law in Houston for 24 years and served as a mediator in civil disputes for 16 years.

In October of 2013, he was elected by the Harris County District Court judges to complete his predecessor’s term as Local Administrative Judge for the Harris County District Courts. He was subsequently elected by his colleagues to full two-year terms in December 2013, December 2015 and December 2017. Prior to his election as Local Administrative Judge, he served as the Administrative Judge for the Civil Trial division from 2012 to 2013. In 2010 he served by special assignment as a Justice on the 14th Court of Appeals. The State Multidistrict Litigation Panel selected him to serve as the pretrial judge for the Toyota Unintended Acceleration Multidistrict Litigation in 2010 and for the General Motors Ignition Switch Multidistrict Litigation in 2014. In 2014 Judge Schaffer was selected as the Trial Judge of the Year by the Texas Association of Civil Trial and Appellate Specialists and as the Distinguished Alumnus at South Texas College of Law Houston. He has served as a member of the Harris County Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee since 2013.

Judge Schaffer earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Arizona in 1974. Following his graduation from college he worked in local and state government in Austin before attending law school at South Texas College of Law Houston. He received his law degree in 1984 and began his legal career as an associate with a small Houston law firm before opening his own law office in 1990 as a sole practitioner. Soon after he opened his law office, he expanded his practice to include mediation services in civil disputes. He continued in that practice until he became a judge in 2009.

Judge Schaffer has been married to Jo Ann Weiss Schaffer (also a local attorney) for 30 years and they have three children: Michael who is 27 years old and Shelly and Alex who are 20 years old.
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Judge Michael Schneider
Juvenile District Court Representative
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Judge Michael Schneider
Juvenile District Court Representative
Judge Michael “Mike” Schneider was elected to preside in the 315th Juvenile District Court in 2006. His victory came months after Texas Governor Rick Perry appointed him to the bench. Voters returned him to the bench in 2010 and 2014.

Mike is a graduate of St. Thomas High School, Texas A&M University and the South Texas College of Law. He was also a visiting student at the University of Texas School of Law.

Mike has fought to improve the chances of success for abused children in prolonged foster care situations and earned praise for his leadership in fighting human trafficking by creating a renowned court for young girls pulled into the dangerous world of the sex exploitation. Mike also started the county’s first juvenile drug court in 2010.

Before becoming a judge, Mike joined the staff of the Harris County Attorney’s Office in 1999. He served as chief civil prosecutor in the 313th Juvenile District Court and handled thousands of cases involving abused and neglected children. He was later named Deputy Division Chief of the office’s Children’s Protective Division and General Counsel to the world-renowned Children’s Assessment Center (CAC) – a public-private partnership that provides legal and counseling services to sexually abused children. Mike also served as the head of the County Attorney’s CAC Partnership Team.

Before taking the bench, Mike tried hundreds of contested cases in juvenile and family courts. He supervised a staff of more than 35 with roughly 3,000 active child protective custody cases.

Since taking the bench, Mike has presided over roughly 30,000 cases, including complex jury trials that have involved the varied disciplines of family law, criminal law and child custody. At the same time, Mike has worked hard to expand the pool of qualified attorneys assigned to the complex cases heard in his court.

In 2015, he received the Houston Bar Association’s President’s Award for creating a program to provide pro bono legal representation to indigent individuals seeking to have their juvenile records sealed.

As a member of the county’s Juvenile Probation Board, Mike has pushed for safe and money-saving alternatives to juvenile incarceration, improvements to how juveniles are incarcerated and better courthouse security.


At the same time, as state leaders grappled with problems in the Texas Youth Commission (TYC), Mike helped establish the position of a local TYC Review Officer and a toll-free hotline for families to report abuse in state facilities to local authorities. The entry into such a statewide issue was nothing new to the judge.


In 2010, he became a Sustaining Life Fellow of the charitable Texas Bar Foundation. Mike is also a Life Fellow of the Houston Bar Foundation – the charitable arm of the HBA. He has served on the HBA Pro Bono Award Committee since its creation. Judge Schneider is also a voting member of the nation’s oldest judicial membership organization – the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

In 2013, Mike became a Senior Fellow of the nonpartisan American Leadership Forum and currently serves on the Harris County Juvenile Board, Public Defender Board and Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, as well as the Council of the Juvenile Section of the State Bar of Texas and as a Commissioner on the Texas Supreme Court’s Children’s Commission.

He has also served as a volunteer instructor for Child Advocates, Inc. and, when an attorney, was a member of the Interdisciplinary Child Abuse Task Force at Memorial Hermann Hospital. In addition, Mike is a featured speaker at national conferences on child abuse and juvenile justice issues. He hosted the first local program to educate the legal community on the correlation between animal abuse and child abuse and established the first Animal Law Scholarship at the South Texas College of Law.

Mike also served as a Visiting Associate Justice on the First Court of Appeals in 2016. The same year he was appointed co-Chair of Houston’s Youth Justice Council (My Brother’s Keeper).

In 2017, Mike was appointed Adjunct Associate Research Scholar at Columbia University in the city of New York.
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Commissioner Rodney Ellis
Commissioners Court Representative
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Commissioner Rodney Ellis
Commissioners Court Representative
Commissioner Rodney Ellis was born and raised in Houston’s Sunnyside neighborhood and attended the Texas public school system from grade school through law school. Although he is an attorney, his passion is public service.

On Nov. 8, 2016, he was elected Harris County Commissioner for Precinct One, which serves approximately 1.1 million people. Previously, he represented a Houston district in the Texas Senate for more than 25 years, earning widespread praise as a leader on economic development, education, civil rights, budget issues, responsible environmental policy, tax cuts for the middle class, criminal justice, and workforce development.

Commissioner Ellis believes the role of government is to ensure that all people have the opportunity and ability to build a better future for themselves. As Harris County Commissioner, he is dedicated to providing quality and accessible services and programs that will enhance the lives of people in Precinct One and fighting for reforms that will benefit all Harris County residents.

During his career in public service, Commissioner Ellis has worked hard to ensure that children have equal access to a quality education, regardless of where they reside. He also has spearheaded legislation to provide employees with a safe workplace, access to affordable health care and a living wage. In criminal justice, he has fought for reforms that guarantee equal treatment for everyone under the law. It’s his cardinal belief that guilt and innocence must never be dependent on one’s income, gender, race or ethnicity.

Before joining the Texas Senate in 1990, Commissioner Ellis served three terms on the Houston City Council and as chief of staff to the late U.S. Congressman Mickey Leland. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Southern University, a master’s degree from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, and a law degree from the University of Texas School of Law. Commissioner Ellis also studied at Xavier University in New Orleans and the London School of Economics.

Commissioner Ellis is married to Licia Green-Ellis and has four children.
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Mayor Sylvester Turner
Mayor, City of Houston
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Mayor Sylvester Turner
Mayor, City of Houston
Elected in December 2015, Sylvester Turner is serving his first four-year term as Houston’s 62nd mayor. Since taking office, Mayor Turner eliminated a $160 million budget shortfall in record time; led the city’s remarkable rebound from Hurricane Harvey; championed historic pension reform; cheered on the 2017 World Series-winning Houston Astros; hosted a successful Super Bowl LI; expanded municipal investments in renewable energy and led the winning bid to host the World Petroleum Congress in 2020.

As the head of the energy capital of the world and the most diverse city in the nation, Mayor Turner has brought a performance-driven approach to the job, creating more responsive, streamlined and efficient delivery of city services while shoring up Houston’s financial future. Thanks to his leadership, the Texas Legislature and local voters approved the pension reform package that reduces the city’s liability by billions of dollars and provided a “fix” that had eluded the city for 17 years.

One of the mayor’s signature initiatives is Complete Communities, which aims to improve the quality of life for residents in all neighborhoods. The mayor’s other priorities include filling more than 90,000 potholes on city streets, implementing a six-point holistic plan for addressing homelessness, reducing flooding and improving drainage.

Mayor Turner’s civic leadership has been nationally recognized through his service as a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Transportation and Communications Standing Committee, vice chair of the National Climate Action Agenda, member of the C40 and Global Covenant for Mayor’s for Climate and Energy and an advisory board member of the African American Mayors Association. He is also the recipient of the Ohtli Award, the Mexican government’s highest honor. Turner has been featured in publications and news outlets such as 60 Minutes, MSNBC, CNN, CNBC, FOX News, Wall Street Journal, Black Enterprise Magazine, Cuba Today Magazine, Ebony, New York Times, Washington Post and USA Today.

Prior to his election as mayor, Turner served for 27 years in the Texas House as the representative for District 139. He worked on the House Appropriations Committee for 21 years and served as Speaker Pro Tem for three terms. He was appointed to several Budget Conference Committees to help balance the state’s budget and served on the Legislative Budget Board.

Mayor Turner is a life-long resident of Houston and lives in the Acres Homes community where he grew up with eight siblings. He is a graduate of the University of Houston and earned a law degree from Harvard University. He began his law practice at Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P. and later founded the Barnes & Turner Law Firm.

Mayor Turner is the proud father of First Daughter Ashley Turner, who is continuing the family tradition of public service in the healthcare field.
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Judge Vanessa Velasquez
Administrative Judge, Criminal Division of District Courts
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Judge Vanessa Velasquez
Administrative Judge, Criminal Division of District Courts
Judge Vanessa Velasquez was appointed to preside in the 183rd Criminal District Court in October 2005 by former Texas Gov. Rick Perry. She won her first four-year term in 2006, a second term in 2010 and voters awarded her a third in 2014.

Elected by her colleagues in 2017 to serve as the Administrative Judge for Harris County’s Criminal District Judges, she has consistently been one of the highest-rated criminal judges in local bar polls. She understands the perspectives from both sides since she has worked both as a defense attorney and a prosecutor.

Judge Velasquez joined the Harris County District Attorney’s Office in 1990, served as a chief felony prosecutor and worked there until her judicial appointment.

During her 15-year stint as a prosecutor, Judge Velasquez was a Chief Prosecutor in the Major Offenders and Narcotics Division and Chief Prosecutor in the 228th Criminal District Court, the 174th Criminal District Court and the 184th Criminal District Court.
She also served as Chief Prosecutor in the Probable Cause Court and was a Deputy Chief Prosecutor in the Misdemeanor Division. As a prosecutor, Judge Velasquez was the lead attorney in more than 100 jury trials.

Judge Velasquez is a graduate of the University of Houston and the South Texas College of Law. She is a member of the Houston Bar Association, the State Bar of Texas and St. Michael’s Catholic Church. She is also a former mentor at Jeff Davis High School.

She also serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Houston Law Center, where she has taught trial advocacy since 2008, and is one of four criminal district judges presiding over the highly-successful STAR (Success Through Addiction Recovery) Drug Court. She has also sat as a visiting justice in the 14th Court of Appeals on two specially-assigned criminal appellate matters.
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Judge Natalie Fleming
Presiding Judge, County Criminal Courts at Law
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Judge Natalie Fleming
Presiding Judge, County Criminal Courts at Law
Judge Natalie C. Fleming is the presiding judge of Harris County Criminal Court at Law #3. Judge Fleming was recently voted by her peers, to be the Presiding Judge over the sixteen County Criminal Courts at Law.

Judge Fleming is a first generation Hispanic American born and raised in Houston. She is a graduate of St. Agnes Academy and received her undergraduate degree from the University of St. Thomas. She then went on and earned her law degree from South Texas College of Law in 1988.

Upon becoming licensed to practice law in 1989, Judge Fleming started her legal career working for Harris County District Attorney, John B. Holmes, Jr. as a prosecutor. As an Assistant District Attorney, Judge Fleming obtained experience in many areas, including felony, misdemeanor, and death row penalty appeals.

After over 5 years, she resigned as a prosecutor to stay home with her children and work part time as a visiting judge throughout the then 15 County Criminal Courts. She continued this practice for 15 years. Also during this time, Judge Fleming gained experience as being an Ad Litem attorney in representing the interest of children throughout the several County Civil Courts.

In 2010, Judge Fleming was appointed by unanimous vote by the Harris County Commissioners’ Court as Judge of Harris County Criminal Court at Law #3. She was then subsequently elected two times to that position.

Because Judge Fleming is fluent in Spanish, since 2010, she has volunteered tireless hours as the first Judge in Harris County to preside over a Spanish-speaking SOBER Court. The Harris County SOBER Court program helps rehabilitate intoxicated driving offenders to prevent recidivism. Judge Fleming has devoted herself, through this program to improve public safety for the citizens of Harris County.

Judge Fleming has been active in various charitable activities in her community, and has been recognized by a number of these. She and her husband of almost 30 years, Michael P. Fleming are the proud parents of six children.



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Chris Tritico
Defense Attorney
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Chris Tritico
Defense Attorney
Christopher L. Tritico, a native of Houston, Texas, received his Bachelors Degree at Sam Houston State University and his Doctor of Jurisprudence at South Texas College of Law.

Mr. Tritico is licensed to practice law in the State of Texas and before the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth and the Tenth Circuits, and the United States District Court for the Southern and Eastern Districts of Texas. He is a member of the State Bar of Texas, The National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, The Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, The Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association, President 2012 and The Houston Bar Association. Mr. Tritico was named one of Texas Super Lawyers 2003 - 2017 by Texas Monthly Magazine. Mr. Tritico was named one of the Top Lawyers for the People by H Texas Magazine in 2005-2017. Named one of Texas Top rated lawyers 2012 and The National Trial Lawyers Top 100 Lawyers, 2012 - 2017. In 2014 his name was placed on the Wall of Honor for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Sam Houston State University and given the Reflections of Hope Award by the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. Senior Fellow, American Leadership Forum, Class XXXIII.

A criminal defense his entire career, Mr. Tritico handles cases in both state and federal courts; ranging from environmental law to capital murder. Representing notable athletes such as Moses Malone, former Houston Rocket, Gary Sheffield, All-Star third baseman for the Florida Marlins and Julio Lugo, former Houston Astro. In 1997 Mr. Tritico was one of the trial lawyers representing Timothy McVeigh in the Oklahoma City Bombing. Since 1988, Mr. Tritico has represented the interest of professional educators he is General Counsel for the Houston Federation of Teachers, AFT-Lone Star, Cy Fair AFT, Spring Branch AFT and North East Houston AFT. Mr. Tritico has represented teachers’ interest in both criminal district court and civil district court in Harris County, Texas.

Mr. Tritico began his career as an associate of famed attorney Richard “Racehorse” Haynes. After leaving Mr. Haynes’ office in 1994, Mr. Tritico started his present firm Tritico Rainey, P. L.L.C. in 2011. A regular speaker, Mr. Tritico has presented workshops in areas such as administrative rights for teachers and on criminal law. In 1988, Mr. Tritico authored an article entitled “Investigative Techniques Every Lawyer Should Know.” In 1997 he authored “Teacher Contracts and the Hearing Process: The Road to Victory” The Houston Lawyer, March/April 1997, Vol. 34, No.5 and in 2008 he authored “Collision Course: When Criminal Law and School Law Meet” Voice for the Defense, October 2008, Vol 37, No. 8

Mr. Tritico has appeared on Megyn Kelly Today, Good Morning America, World News Tonight, Night Line, CBS Evening News, Meet the Press, Dateline NBC, 20/20, CNN, Fox News Channel, Court TV and others both nationally and internationally. In 2018 The Oxygen Channel premiered “In Defense Of”. Mr. Tritico was Assistant Producer of the series and featured in the premier episode. Mr. Tritico is the host of Fox26Law on Fox, 26, KRIV and the legal analyst for Fox 26 and New Radio 740 KTRH in Houston.
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Chris Daniel
District Clerk
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Chris Daniel
District Clerk
Chris Daniel, an engineer and attorney, has brought his energy, skills and training to the Harris County District Clerk’s Office. First elected to this office in 2010, he heads an office staffed by about 550 people and oversees a $36 million budget that has remained lean even as the county is putting the recession behind it. His office staffs 80 statutory courts and ten (10) specialty courts with clerks, maintains records for these courts and runs jury service. Chris knows that bridge-building and diplomacy skills are a great advantage as he works with scores of judges and county officials to improve court operations. Previously, Chris Daniel was elected to the Board for Lone Star College System.

In 2013, with Chris Daniel’s leadership, the office implemented a convenient passport application operation to assist the people of Harris County in applying for and renewing their passports. With such innovative thinking, Chris was re-elected to the Office in 2014.

In 2016, he opened four (4) satellite passport application operations to meet suburbanites’ needs. He partnered with the Harris County Library System to make the passport application services available in County libraries in Clear Lake, Humble, Spring/Tomball and Katy. There is now a passport application operation office in Pasadena.

Chris collaborated with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, the District Attorney’s Office and judges to create eSubpoena, an efficient, electronic system that greatly reduces the time it takes to notify witnesses of their service. The digitized system helped make the courts safer at the Harris County Criminal Justice Center. One person can now process the subpoenas, allowing three dozen deputies to remain in the courtrooms and help maintain courtroom security.

Chris has spearheaded efforts to warn the public about jury scams. He oversaw a multi-pronged public awareness campaign, featuring public service announcements on television and radio, radio PSAs in Spanish, posters on more than 900 Metro buses and news interviews with newspaper, TV and radio reporters.

Chris was born in Houston and grew up in Jersey Village and north of Acres Homes in Willowwood. His mother, Jolie, grew up on Curacao, an island off Venezuela that was part of the Netherlands Antilles. From his family, especially his mother, he learned to speak Dutch among other languages. His father was born in North Little Rock, Arkansas and came from a long line of farmers and ranchers.

After earning a mechanical engineering degree at the University of Texas at Austin, he first worked as a project manager at National Oilwell Varco. Furthering his engineering career, he moved on to KBR, where he was employed as a design engineer. While employed full-time, and while serving on the Board of Lone Star College (elected in 2006), he also enrolled in classes and graduated from South Texas College of Law, passing the bar in 2011.

In 2012, Chris married Jennifer Barber, a CPA and Baylor graduate who grew up in Barber’s Hill, Texas. They have two amazing children, John and Amanda. The Daniel family resides in Humble and they are active members of Second Baptist Church. Chris also attends Bible classes at Champion Forest Baptist Church. Chris and Jennifer, have many varied interests, including traveling and scuba diving.

An active Boy Scout, he went on to become an Eagle Scout. His pride in this achievement remains – his award decorated Scout’s shirt hangs in his office today and he serves on the Board for the Sam Houston Area Council. Chris Daniel is an ex-officio Director and a lifetime member of the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo. He is a member of the World Champion Barbecue Cook-off Committee and the Lamb and Goat Auction Committee.
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Ed Gonzalez
Sheriff
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Ed Gonzalez
Sheriff
Sheriff Ed Gonzalez, a lifelong Houstonian, was elected on November 8, 2016 as the Sheriff of Harris County. On January 1, 2017, Gonzalez became the 30th Sheriff of Harris County, Texas.

Sheriff Gonzalez earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from the University of Houston Downtown and went on to serve 18 years in the Houston Police Department. Sheriff Gonzalez started out as a civilian employee and became a police officer, rising through the ranks to Sergeant. He served on the elite hostage negotiation team and was assigned to the Homicide Division as an investigator.

After retiring from the Houston Police Department in 2009, Sheriff Gonzalez served three terms on the Houston City Council representing District H. He was elected by his peers in 2010 to serve as Vice Mayor Pro-Tem and was appointed Mayor Pro-Tem in 2012 by Mayor Annise Parker.

Sheriff Gonzalez chaired the council’s Public Safety & Homeland Security Committee. Sheriff Gonzalez resorted to the core of his law enforcement background and experience to improve public safety and neighborhood protection – breaking new ground with initiatives to protect vulnerable seniors from elder abuse, expand the fight against human trafficking, reduce the public safety risks of stray animals, protect cyclists and pedestrians on city streets and protect online buyers and sellers from predators.

The Harris County Sheriff’s Office is the largest Sheriff Office in the State of Texas, and the third largest nationwide. Sheriff Gonzalez leads upwards of 5,000 employees to protect the County’s 4.5 million residents within the 1,700 square miles of Harris County
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Judge Paula Goodhart
Administrative Judge, Statutory County Courts
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Judge Paula Goodhart
Administrative Judge, Statutory County Courts
Paula Goodhart is currently the Judge of Harris County Criminal Court at Law #1. Judge Goodhart grew up in Houston attending schools in the Pasadena Independent School District. After receiving her undergraduate degree with Honors from the University of Texas at Austin, Judge Goodhart received her law degree from the University of Houston. Upon graduation in 1993, Judge Goodhart was hired as an Assistant District Attorney where she served the citizens of Harris County until 2007. While at the District Attorney's Office, Judge Goodhart served as a District Court Chief and was assigned to the Trial Bureau, the Public Affairs Bureau and Special Crimes. In 2007 she began a private practice focusing on criminal defense. In March of 2010, Judge Goodhart was appointed by the Harris County Commissioner's Court to fill the judicial vacancy in County Criminal Court at Law #1. In November 2010, Judge Goodhart was elected Judge of Court #1.
Judge Goodhart is only the 4th judge to preside over Criminal Court #1 since its inception and the first female judge elected to that court. While presiding over Harris County Criminal Court at Law #1, Judge Goodhart received the 2013 Mothers Against Drunk Driving Judiciary Service Award and has been appointed to serve on numerous committees. Judge Goodhart is also an American Leadership Forum Senior Fellow and member of Criminal Justice Class IV.
In addition to her other judicial duties, Judge Goodhart presides over the 4th Harris County S.O.B.E.R. (Saving Ourselves By Education and Recovery) D.W.I. Court. The goal of the Harris County S.O.B.E.R. Court program is to increase public safety and to reduce long-term costs to the criminal justice system and the community through intense supervision utilizing a multi-disciplinary team effort. This program is a collaborative effort involving the Harris County Criminal Courts at Law, the District Attorney's Office, local defense attorneys, the Community Supervision and Corrections Department, the Harris County Sheriff's Department and other treatment providers and social services agencies in Harris County. In DWI Courts, seriously alcohol addicted individuals remain in treatment for long periods of time while under close supervision. The S.O.B.E.R. Court in Harris County Criminal Court #1 will serve young offenders primarily in their 20's.
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Judge Lincoln Goodwin
Presiding Judge, Justice of the Peace Courts
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Judge Lincoln Goodwin
Presiding Judge, Justice of the Peace Courts
Judge Goodwin earned his undergraduate degree from Baylor University in 1994 before earning his law degree at the Texas Tech University School of Law in 1998. He was admitted to the Texas State Bar in 1998. While at Texas Tech, he served as President of the Student Bar Association and as a member of both the Law School Honor Council and the Texas Tech University Disciplinary Committee. Judge Goodwin also founded the Susan Fortney Award for Ethics, an annual award presented to the Texas Tech law student who most exemplifies the honor and integrity required of the legal profession.

Following Law school, Judge Goodwin served for two years as a law clerk to U.S. District Judge Sam R. Cummings in the Northern District of Texas. After completing his clerkship, he returned to his hometown of Houston where he handled litigation matters for several Fortune 500 companies at a large national law firm. He then worked as an Assistant District Attorney at the Harris County District Attorney’s Office in Houston. After leaving the District Attorney’s Office, Judge Goodwin was a senior attorney with the Lanier Law Firm representing clients in a variety of civil litigation matters.

Originally from Laramie, Wyoming, Judge Goodwin has lived in Texas since 1982. He lives in Precinct 4 with his wife and is the proud father of two beautiful daughters. He serves as a deacon at Houston’s First Baptist Church. Judge Goodwin runs a marathon every year and has completed an Ironman Triathlon.

Judge Lincoln Goodwin was unanimously appointed by Commissioners Court to serve as the Justice of the Peace, Precinct 4, Place 1 on December 16, 2014. Precinct 4, Place 1 is one of the largest Justice of the Peace Courts in the State of Texas with annual case filings of over 100,000.